COVID-19 update

City of Prospect has taken a number of important and proactive steps to protect our community and staff as we face this unprecedented situation of the global COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic and the nationwide Public Health Emergency.

We need to take all reasonable steps available to protect our community, our Elected Members, our staff and volunteers (and their families) against the spread of this infection while ensuring we deliver services as close to ‘business as usual’ as possible.

Find out more.

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders

Ninna Marni – Welcome

Acknowledgement of Country

City of Prospect acknowledges that we are on the traditional country of the Kaurna people of the Adelaide Plains region and we pay our respect to Elders past and present. We recognise and respect their cultural heritage, beliefs and relationships with the land and we acknowledge that they are of continuing importance to the Kaurna people living today.

Reconciliation Action Plan

City of Prospect has embarked on a journey of reconciliation to increase our support and relationship with the local and broader Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community. On 12 August 2013 Council formally endorsed a Statement of Reconciliation and National Sorry Day Acknowledgement.

Council has committed to a Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) at the ‘Innovate’ level to acknowledge and review the practical actions the organisation will take to build strong relationships and enhance respect and awareness between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians, both external and internal to the organisation.

Council’s RAP has been developed through a comprehensive audit of existing Council activities and gap identification exercises. This information was then transferred onto the Reconciliation Australia RAP Template under the themes of ‘relationships’, ‘respect’, ‘opportunities’ and ‘tracking and progress’. This process proved valuable for it was the first time that council has documented and acknowledged all of the various activities it undertakes in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

- Relationships.

We believe that developing stronger and mutually respectful relationships based on open and honest dialogue and productive partnerships is the way forward between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians in our community. Council is well placed to connect people in our community through its available networks, engagement strategies, recognition events and awards celebrations and awareness raising from a range of communication technologies at our disposal.

- Respect.

We believe that Council’s activities and business can be an ideal platform to build greater levels of respect by increasing our understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to a wide audience, including Elected Members, employees and the local community. It is important for Council to establish achievable actions and deliverables related to gathering knowledge, building awareness and practicing respect.

- Opportunities.

Council supports the development and implementation of actions under its sphere of influence that contributes towards employment and professional development for, and supplies and services from, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, wherever justified.

Click here for a copy of our Reconciliation Action Plan

Kaurna Language in Prospect

Kaurna Warra Karrpanthi (KWK) is the leading group dedicated to Kaurna language revitalisation and maintenance. The traditional lands and language of the Kaurna people include the Adelaide Plains of South Australia.

Council has on a number of occasions consulted KWK to pursue an interest in the use of Kaurna language for naming sites and locations throughout our City.

Most recently Payinthi being the name chosen for the newly constructed library, community hub and administration centre at 128 Prospect Road.

Payinthi is a simple translation into Kaurna of the English language word Prospect, with correct pronunciation being Payin-di

Other examples of Kaurna language in use throughout our City are as follows

  • Narnu Wirra (Prospect Gardens)

Bounded by Mawson St, East Terrace, Buchanan St and West Terrace, Nailsworth.

  • Payinthi yarta (Prospect Oval)

Menzies Crescent, Prospect.

  • Yarnta Tutu yarta (Broadview Sports and Recreation Precinct)

Bounded by Collingrove Ave, Myponga Terrace, Poltawa Terrace and McInnes Avenue.

  • Parndo yerta (Charles Cane Reserve)

Corner Churchill Road and Elizabeth Street, Prospect

Interestingly, the use of this language was more relevant to the Reserves previous tenant, Ovingham AFL Club, rather than its current use by BOSA Soccer Club and Eagles Lacrosse Club.

Parndo – meaning ball made from possum skin and used during the origins of the game of AFL football, and yerta meaning ‘ground’.

Finally, Council was keen to seize the opportunity of the new large property development at the northern end of Churchill Road to use Kaurna language for some of the new street names.  When the development is opened, you will be able to drive, walk or ride a bike down Parnta Avenue or Payinthi Drive or simply sit and enjoy the small park named Pingku Walk.

Each of these Kaurna words have the English language translation as follows:

  • Parnta – Lime; limestone; brick
  • Payinthi – Prospect
  • Pingku – Bilby

City of Prospect has embarked on a journey of reconciliation to increase our support and relationship with the local and broader Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community. On 12 August 2013 Council formally endorsed the following Statement of Reconciliation and National Sorry Day Acknowledgement.

Click here to view the National Sorry Day and Statement of Reconciliation